New treatments for newborns

EMLA is a patch that can be pasted to a child’s skin an hour to three hours before the needle stick procedure. It contains two topical anesthetics, Lidocaine and prilocaine. Like Ethyl Chloride it can be used on all kinds of needle stick procedures, vaccinations, antibiotics and blood drawing to check blood glucose levels. Another advantage of EMLA is if the child has to be stuck several times in the same spot.

The skin only needs one application of EMLA to remain numb for a couple of hours. Ethyl Chloride spray wears off quickly and must be reapplied.

When positioning EMLA on the inside of the elbow, position is so it is in a diamond pattern. This will help it stick to the skin better.

Because EMLA takes at least an hour to cause a numbing effect there is no danger if the patch or cream comes in temporary contact with the wrong area of the body. Simply wipe off the unwanted EMLA. But if If EMLA comes in contact with your child’s eyes, immediately rinse the eye with water and do not touch the eye. Call your Poison control center or local emergency service. Also call your doctor.

When you purchase EMLA or EMLA cream there will be a diagram inside the box. Show that to your child’s doctor or nurse and ask them to mark on it, where the next injections will be given. Then you will know where to apply the EMLA or EMLA cream to your child for his/her next visit..

On March 11, 1999, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of EMLA for newborns.

This means even new born babies can be given pain relief for intramuscular injections of vitamin K and hepatitis B vaccine, and heel lancing for genetic testing or bilirubin levels.

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